WR
search
search by author or title

Dot.Bomb

My Days and Nights at an Internet Goliath

(amazon)

David Kuo (View Bio)
Hardcover: Little, Brown, 2001; Paperback: Back Bay Books, 2003.

Dot.Bomb
(amazon)

An insider's account of one of the biggest debacles in e–business, the rise and fall of ambitious ValueAmerica.com: "The Marketplace for the Millennium."

A Good Morning America "Read This!" Book Club Selection

"This is a wild ride of a book, hilarious and horrific an always, always painfully honest. A cautionary tale of cyber-insanity, a PILGRIM'S PROGRESS for the information age." — Joe Klein, author of PRIMARY COLORS

"Riveting.... Craig Winn cavorted in his dot.com excess, and the book is peppered with examples of his whimsy.... Kuo writes with journalistic precision and has a knack for colorful detail.... Unlike many corporate memoirs, DOT.BOMB is easily read, even for those without the slightest knowledge of business fundamentals. It is partly a comedy of errors, to be sure, but is also a lesson in business survival." — San Diego Union–Tribune

"Mr. Kuo describes his experiences as a dot.com spinmeister in a very readable book." — Dallas Morning News

"Monomania is not only a prerequisite for riches; it's also evidently de rigueur for spectacular failure. Exhibit A is DOT.BOMB: My Days and Nights at an Internet Goliath, J. David Kuo's savagely funny account of the rise and fall of Value America, on of the many dot-com ventures once so beloved by investors.... [M]ad-dog entrepreneur Craig Winn['s] portrayal in this book is worth the price of admission alone.... [A] compulsively readable book." — The Wall Street Journal

"Kuo's story of boom and bust may be all to familiar to many web pioneers, but it's entertaining reading." — Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"Kuo expertly a dramatic sensibility onto this familiar boom-and-bust story, drafting exchanges between Value America's major players like scenes in a novel. Craig Winn, the company's charismatic, ambitious, fatally flawed hero-founder, seems worth of a Greek tragedy.... Those vicariously seeking the thrill of the twentieth century's most dynamic business period will find Kuo a good storyteller and an engaging guide." — Publishers Weekly

"J. David Kuo slashes open the carcass of one of the most notorious dot-com failures in DOT.BOMB: My Days and Nights at an Internet Goliath. What comes pouring out is a riveting look at Value America, a one-time investor darling that collapsed under poor management.... Kuo writes with journalistic precision, and has a knack for colorful detail.... Unlike many corporate memoirs, DOT.BOMB is an easy read, even for those without the slightest knowledge of business fundamentals. It is partly a comedy of errors, to be sure, but is also a lesson in business survival." — Cox News Service

"Intriguing.... Kuo's book captures the inane atmosphere of the Internet era. It pours cold water onto the great axioms, such as the one that profit doesn't matter." — Virginia Business

"Hilarious.... Kuo didn't amass the hundreds of millions that at one point seemed strangely realistic, but his account of the time he spent trying is very rich, indeed." — The Weekly Standard

"DOT.BOMB captures our recent collective innocence so effortlessly, it's almost impossible to read through more than a few pages without feeling one's ears burn with shame at the fools we were." — Washington Post Book World

"An informative and sometimes entertaining insider's view of the e-commerce world that was.... The book is at its most compelling in the final fifty pages or so, when Value America is collapsing." — National Journal

"An entertaining chronicle of the waste, on-the-hoof planning, and early warning signs.... Mr. Kuo captures the euphoria of ordinary employees and seasoned managers giddy with paper-riches." — Financial Times

"A wildly entertaining romp through the worst of the dot-com era.... Kuo describes a passel of characters worthy of a Tom Wolfe novel.... You're bound to love it." — BusinessWeek

"A cautionary business tale for the readers of Forbes and Fortune." — Kirkus Reviews

Up Back to Top